Antwone Fisher

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Just try, Dr. Davenport explains, and everything will be okay. Antwone tries, and everything is okay. Isn't that nice?

I want a psychiatrist just like Navy Dr. Jerome Davenport (Denzel Washington). I'm pretty sure he can do for me exactly what he did for Antwone Fisher (Derek Luke). You see, Antwone went to Dr. Davenport when he was having problems, and Dr. Davenport waved his magic wand and everything was okay.

Antwone has serious anger management issues. After he talks to Dr. Davenport, however, he understands that he has to face his demons, find the mother who gave him away, and discover that there's a really nice family waiting for him. The only thing holding Antwone back is his willingness to try. Just try, Dr. Davenport explains, and everything will be okay. Antwone tries, and everything is okay. Isn't that nice?

Despite his anger management issues, despite the fact that he was raised by a mean woman who beat him and another who sexually abused him, Antwone finds himself a girlfriend who helps him on his quest. This gives Antwone the extra strength he needs to succeed. Fortunately for Antwone, he's able to draw a distinction between his new girlfriend, Cheryl (Joy Bryant), and the mean women who raised him, just like all former abused children do.

Knowing all this, what do you think Dr. Davenport's advice to Antwone might be? "Go. Have a good time." Ah, now that's the mark of every good psychiatrist! I think that's what Ted Bundy's psychiatrist told him just before he went out on his last sorority date.

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