The Deep End of the Ocean

Bomb Rating: 

Beth and Pat and their kids live in Chicago for most of the movie. I don't know if the title is some sort of typo, but that big watery thing that you see out east when you're walking down parts of Michigan Avenue is called a lake.

I don't understand this title at all. Beth (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Pat(Treat Williams) and their kids live in Chicago for most of the movie. I don't know if the title is some sort of typo, but that big watery thing that you see out east when you're walking down parts of Michigan Avenue is called a lake. It happens to be really big, but that still doesn't make it an ocean. Furthermore, I think if you go to the "end" of it you're still in the shallow end because the entire thing has been filled with toxic waste and hypodermic needles.

Frankly, I don't want to be thinking about these types of metaphors while I'm watching a movie. What damn ocean do they mean, anyway? Pacific? Atlantic? Indian? I'm one of those people who has a good sense of direction, and I like to know where I am, geographically-speaking. Okay, so maybe that's it: I'm not supposed to know where I am. The truth is elusive. God is real. My feet are cold.

Speaking of cold, that's Beth after she loses her three-year-old kid, Ben. She leaves him for a moment in 1988 and whoosh, he's gone. This has all sorts of bad effects on Beth's family. She and Pat start sleeping in separate beds. Vincent (Jonathan Jackson) is traumatized. Holiday celebrations become annoying. Incidentally, and this is a message for the filmmakers, if it's 1988 I don't want to see 1993 Hondas driving around. I'm also suspicious of families dumb enough to need a kidnapping to make them realize that holiday gatherings are excruciating.

Ten years later, Ben shows up at the door. He doesn't know he's Ben, as his name is Sam now, but Beth knows it's him because she's got that amazing female radar that just sort of senses that strangers are their children and that the dog is doing something wrong. Without giving any thought to the ramifications, Beth and Pat yank Ben from his adoptive home and expect him to play happy. It doesn't quite work out that way, not that I really cared, because no matter where Pat went in Chicago, she wasn't getting in the deep end of any ocean.

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