Godsend

Bomb Rating: 

This is less a horror film than a so-called "thriller" and the director, Nick Hamm, takes about as many risks as a teenager wearing a life jacket in a kiddie pool.

I'll pay this film one compliment: The idea is actually pretty good. It's inevitable that somebody is going to clone a human being one of these days and what better way to explore the problems of such a moral and ethical conundrum than in a horror film? Unfortunately, this is less a horror film than a so-called "thriller" and the director, Nick Hamm, takes about as many risks as a teenager wearing a life jacket in a kiddie pool.

When Adam Duncan (Cameron Bright) dies at the age of eight, his parents, Paul (Greg Kinnear) and Jessie (Rebecca Romijn-Stamos) are distraught as any parents would be. Before they have a chance to properly grieve, Dr. Richard Wells (Robert De Niro) appears out of nowhere and offers them the chance to have another child through cloning. He's like the Tinkerbell of unethical medical procedures.

Of course, there are many glaring problems with this whole thing. First, no parents with a shred of decency and intelligence would ever go through with it, but Paul and Jessie just decide to go ahead without consulting anybody other than the sneaky Dr. Wells. Second, cloning a human being is highly illegal, yet Wells operates out of seemingly huge clinic. Secrets like cloning human beings are a bit hard to keep, so it would have been a lot more plausible if Wells' clinic were in another country or underground.

Eventually Adam grows up to be fairly similar to the other Adam, but when he passes the age when he died problems begin. Adam has horrible dreams and begins acting like a psycho. A normal couple would have given the kid some Ritalin and forgot about it, but Paul is convinced it's got something to do with the cloning process and he eventually discovers what's causing the problems. The cause isn't particularly interesting nor does it make a ton of sense.

A better film would have made the parents the bad guys instead of the kid. Imagine a set of parents who had their child cloned and then attempted to force the kid to be like his predecessor in every way. Now there's a horrific life, but these filmmakers were too narrow-minded to see the vast possibilities of which that is merely one.

To spread the word about this Godsend review on Twitter.

To get instant updates of Mr. Cranky reviews, subscribe to our RSS feed.
0 Comments

Like This Godsend Review? Vote it Up.

0

Rate This Movie:

Other Cranky Content You Might Enjoy

  • This film is a religious, right-wing piece of garbage that tries to turn fear of science into a bible-thumping, anti-cloning message.

  • The idea that you should begin a story at its beginning is a tautology.Unfortunately, the meanings of most four-syllable words tend to elude most Hollywood filmmakers, and consequently we're treated t

  • This is a movie from the famous Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu. It's sort of about a family: two elderly parents and their adult children.