Heathers

Bomb Rating: 

Next to "Mallrats" this is Shannen Doherty's greatest cinematic performance, unless you count the spread in "Playboy" where she was not only two-dimensional and inanimate, but naked as well.

Ever since this film was released, Winona Ryder has worked hard to put it behind her and become a respectable actress. Until director Michael Lehmann cast her in "Heathers," Winona had been on her way to a brilliant career a self-assured, R-rated teenage sex kitten. Since "Heathers," Winona has not ventured far from the theraputic, corset-bound solace of such films as "The Age of Innocence" and "Little Women." As a result, Lehmann is stalked daily by hordes of machete-wielding teenage boys obsessed with what might have been.

"Heathers" is the Jack Kevorkian of teenage angst movies. Veronica Sawyer (Ryder) is part of a powerful high school clique consisting of herself and three girls named Heather: Chandler (Kim Walker), McNamara (Lisanne Falk) and Duke (Shannen Doherty). When she meets J.D. (Jack Nicholson (Christian Slater)), they begin killing off popular members of their high school, beginning with Heather Chandler, only to find they've inspired a teenage suicide cult.

Next to "Mallrats" this is Shannen Doherty's greatest cinematic performance, unless you count the spread in "Playboy" where she was not only two-dimensional and inanimate, but naked as well. Ultimately, however, there's really only one important thing to remember about "Heathers": It was made by the same guy who did "Hudson Hawk." That alone should be enough to consign it to the dustbin of cinematic history.

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