Jack and Sarah

Bomb Rating: 

A two-hour course in how to change a diaper interspersed with lots of close-ups of an infant spitting up milk. That's entertainment.

Director Tim Sullivan goes along happily with his slapstick comedy featuring star Richard E. Grant playing an expectant father when, all of a sudden, a godawful tragic drama breaks out: Jack's (Grant) wife Sarah dies and leaves him to raise a baby girl all by himself.

Sullivan's premise for this romantic comedy is analogous to farting the theme to "Love Story": It sounds soothing but smells like crap. First of all, he employs a star who is best known for having a second head growing out of his shoulder in "How to Get Ahead in Advertising." Normally this wouldn't be a problem given the film's fictional nature, but take a look and I bet you'll notice a fairly big zit right between Richard Grant's eyes. I feared for my life waiting for him to sprout some kind of alien appendage.

Jack hires a nanny named Amy (Samantha Mathis), whom he falls in love with, although the only way you'll ever find out about it is by reading this review. Sullivan tries to be so subtle about Jack and Amy's developing feelings for each other that he forgets them entirely, opting instead for a two-hour course in how to change a diaper interspersed with lots of close-ups of an infant spitting up milk. That's entertainment.

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