One Fine Day

Bomb Rating: 

That television feeling seeps out of this film like froth from a rabid dog.

Here's a shock: In George Clooney's second starring movie role, he does one bang-up job playing Dr. Ross from "E.R." playing a New York journalist who falls in love with Michelle Pfeiffer. Man, was I impressed. Same accent. Same speech patterns. Same off-duty wardrobe. Same gruff, just rolled out of bed look. I can't wait to see Dr. Ross play Batman.

What's more, I just can't say enough about a film revolving around the central plot device of two people accidentally switching cell phones. Can you say AT&T product placement? This gives director Michael Hoffman a prime opportunity to angle for a future "ABC Movie of the Week" slot by using that clever split-screen technique every time somebody calls one cell phone expecting to talk to Michelle and gets George instead, which, let me tell you, happens a lot.

Confidence must not be one of Hoffman's better qualities because that television feeling seeps out of this film like froth from a rabid dog. As a testament to Hoffman's TV aspirations I brought a group of people to a viewing of the film with some wine. We played a drinking game in which a glass had to be consumed every time Hoffman attempted a wide shot. What I ended up with was a room full of bored, sober people trying to shove corks up their noses.

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