Surviving Picasso

Bomb Rating: 

This film is directed by James Ivory, known for"Howard's End" and a bevy of other productions where English people walk around challenging each other to butt cheek squeezing contests.

Who knew the great artist Pablo Picasso (Anthony Hopkins) was such a weasel? Apparently, Picasso was a human dandelion, spreading his seed whenever a pretty girl breezed his way.

However, as the title suggests, this film isn't about Picasso per se', but about surviving Picasso, and the woman that survives him is Francoise (Natascha McElhone), who lives with the man for ten years and has two of his children, only to leave him after Picasso starts an affair with the woman who would become his second wife, Jacqueline Roque (Diane Venora).

Apparantly, living with Picasso was something of a psychological minefield. Left in his wake are his first wife, Olga (Jane Lapotaire), the mother (Susannah Harker) of his daughter, and another mistress, Dora (Julianne Moore).

Surprisingly, this film is directed by James Ivory, known for "Howard's End" and a bevy of other productions where English people walk around challenging each other to butt cheek squeezing contests. Frankly, this is very much a breakout film for Ivory -- there's actually some nudity in it. Of course, when Francoise disrobes in front of Picasso there's little cinematic necessity for it -- it's just James Ivory screaming to the world that he's joined the land of the living.

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